Organizing Grant Reimbursement Materials with Help from an Archivist

Organizing Grant Reimbursement Materials with Help from an Archivist

A bit late on my part, but here is my June post for GradHacker: Congratulations! You’ve gotten a grant to travel to a conference or to conduct research! No matter its size or function, that’s a big deal! So, now what? Most of these travel grants require you to pay up front for your trip, including airfare, mileage, hotel or room, library fees, visas, and food. You are only reimbursed after the trip. For poorly paidgraduate students, the economic burden of this type of grant is…

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Clasps that Hold Tight: Archival Sources for Geraldine Brooks’s People of the Book

Clasps that Hold Tight: Archival Sources for Geraldine Brooks’s People of the Book

In her 2008 novel, People of the Book, Geraldine Brooks presents the fictionalized history of a single book through the lens of Hanna Heath, an Australian expert in rare books. Centered on the Sarajevo Haggadah, Brooks flips through its pages and offers her readers a glimpse into the book’s past using clues stuck to, drawn in, spilled on, and missing from the book. Over the next few weeks, I want to provide readers of People of the Book with real-world…

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Finding the Haggadah: Archival Sources for Understanding Geraldine Brooks’s People of the Book

Finding the Haggadah: Archival Sources for Understanding Geraldine Brooks’s People of the Book

In her 2008 novel, People of the Book, Geraldine Brooks presents the fictionalized history of a single book–the Sarajevo Haggadah–as seen by Dr. Hanna Heath, an Australian expert in rare books. Alternating between Hanna’s story and glimpses from the Haggadah’s past, Brooks pieces together the book’s history using the clues stuck to, drawn in, spilled on, and missing from it. Over the next few weeks, I want to provide readers of People of the Book with real-world examples from archives, libraries,…

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A Fair Use Primer for Graduate Students [GradHacker]

A Fair Use Primer for Graduate Students [GradHacker]

In my latest post for GradHacker, I tackle another aspect of copyright law: fair use. When I close my eyes and try to imagine what a Campbell’s Soup can looks like, I am not sure if what I see is the actual object or one of Andy Warhol’s famous works. These iconic cans, regardless of their importance to modern art and American history, are a tangle of popular culture, artistic expression, and copyright litigation, all of which knot around the…

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Mentoring as a Graduate Student [GradHacker Post]

Mentoring as a Graduate Student [GradHacker Post]

In my most recent GradHacker post on Inside Higher Ed, I discuss how mentoring an undergraduate changed the way I see myself as an academic. Honestly, I had no intention of becoming anyone’s mentor. I was deep into the “make it work” stage of my academic career: my dissertation was stagnating, I was teaching a new course in a new discipline, my partner had gotten a job across the country, and I was having health problems. Nevertheless, despite my being…

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Sample Syllabi and Course Websites

Sample Syllabi and Course Websites

Below are links to syllabi have developed and used for teaching undergraduate English composition and history courses. Please feel free to use and modify anything you see here. I’m standing on the shoulders of the amazing instructors who helped me. All I ask is that you pay it forward and be generous with the newbies in your life. Beginning English Composition | Spring 2016 Course Website (Includes Syllabus) Intermediate English Composition | Winter 2016 Syllabus World History: 1500-1900 | Summer 2016 Syllabus Sample…

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A Creative Commons Primer for Graduate Students [GradHacker]

A Creative Commons Primer for Graduate Students [GradHacker]

My March post for GradHacker is all about the Creative Commons and how you can use it in graduate school! Summers in North Carolina were always long, boring, and hot. In order to survive the humidity, my sister and I would spend the morning at the community pool and the afternoon stuck inside. While Kristin preferred to play with her Little People, I would take over the kitchen countertop, covering it with crayons, colored paper, scissors, eight kinds of markers,…

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Complex Writing Projects; Simple Writing Logs

Complex Writing Projects; Simple Writing Logs

Although my writing projects tend to be short, meaning measured by number of words instead of pages, my dissertation is one huge exception. Managing it and keeping myself motivated and accountable requires some outside structure, some sort of device that tracks my progress and doesn’t ding me for not “measuring up.” I have tried some really great software, apps, and online accountability programs (special shout-out to 750 Words); however, they tend to be too complicated, too punitory, or too expensive…

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